New

Nutritional supplements

 Nutritional supplements


 For Americans, your nutritional needs must be met through your diet, however, for some, nutritional supplements are useful in order to obtain the nutrients they lack. But before you buy these nutritional supplements, you should know all the facts about them.


Nutritional supplements



 Supplements vs. Whole Foods: 
The purpose of dietary supplements is not to replace them with food; they do not provide all the nutrients and benefits that are found in whole foods. So, if you are following a healthy diet you may not need nutritional supplements in your system. Whole foods also have three main benefits that supplements do not provide:
Better Nutrition: Whole foods are complex, not monomeric, which means they contain the various micronutrients your body needs. For example, oranges contain vitamin C along with some beta-carotene, calcium, and other nutrients. Essential dietary fiber: This dietary fiber is available in whole foods, such as whole grains, fruits, vegetables and legumes. As part of a healthy diet, fiber helps prevent certain types of diabetes and heart disease.
Protective substances: Whole foods contain other substances necessary for good health. For example, fruits and vegetables contain naturally occurring substances called phytochemicals that may help prevent cancer, heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure. There are also many foods that are a source of antioxidants; They are substances that slow down the natural process that leads to damage to cells and tissues.

Who needs supplements?

 If you're healthy and eat a variety of foods, you likely don't need supplements. The Dietary Guidelines recommend supplements or foods rich in vitamins if: 
  • Pregnant women should get 400 micrograms a day of folic acid, whether it comes from vitamin-rich foods or supplements, in addition to eating foods that contain folate naturally. Pregnant women who should take a prenatal vitamin that contains iron, or a separate iron supplement.
  • Adults age 50 who should eat foods rich in vitamin B12 such as fortified cereals, or take a multivitamin containing B12, or a separate B12 supplement. Adults age 65 who do not live in assisted living facilities or nursing homes who should get 800 IU of vitamin D daily to reduce the risk of falls. That said, supplements may be right for you
  •  You are not eating well or consuming less than 1,600 calories per day. I was a vegetarian and ate a limited variety of food. You don't eat fish two to three times a week. If you have difficulty eating that much fish, some experts recommend adding a fish oil supplement to your daily diet.
  •  You are a woman who has heavy bleeding during her menstrual cycle.
  • You have a medical condition that affects how well your body absorbs or uses nutrients, such as chronic diarrhea, a food allergy, a food intolerance, or a disease of the liver, gallbladder, intestine or pancreas. I underwent gastrointestinal surgery and was unable to digest and absorb nutrients properly. Talk to your doctor or dietitian about which supplements are right for you and at what doses you can take. And be sure to inquire about potential side effects and interactions with any medications you're taking.
 Vitamins and minerals are added to an increasing number of foods, including breakfast cereals and drinks. On top of that, if you take nutritional supplements, you may be getting certain nutrients without knowing it. Eating more than you need can be dangerous for you and can increase your risk of side effects. For example, taking too much iron can cause nausea and vomiting and possibly damage the liver and other organs.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration maintains a list of dietary supplements that are subject to regulatory review or have been known to cause adverse effects. If you are taking any dietary supplement, it is best to check for updates on the FDA website periodically.